PUBLICATION AND RESEARCH

WYAA ENCOURAGES INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS TO PERUSE THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATIONS AND RESEARCH THAT INVOLVE ISSUES VITAL TO AFTERSCHOOL.

Supporting Learning Recovery Through Out of School Time with ESSER III Funding

November 16, 2021: Out of school time—afterschool, before school, summer, and expanded learning programs—complements academic learning and is critical to youth development, our economy, and our communities. The American Rescue Plan provides Wyoming with a third round of federal stimulus funding for K-12 public education through the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund (ESSER III), estimated at $303 million that can be spent at the local level on learning recovery strategies, including comprehensive afterschool and summer programs. These ESSER funds give Wyoming the opportunity to serve kids and families better by prioritizing quality and sustainability. Find it online. Click Here

Wyoming After 3pm

December 8, 2020: Many more Wyoming parents want afterschool programs for their  children than are able to access them, according to a household survey commissioned by the  Afterschool Alliance and released today. It finds that, by overwhelming margins, parents express  strong, broad-based support for afterschool programs. But unmet demand – the percentage of  children in Wyoming not currently in an afterschool program whose parents say they would be  enrolled if an afterschool program were available to them – has increased over the past six years,  with low-income families in particular citing cost as a barrier to enrolling their children. As a  result, for every child in an afterschool program in Wyoming today, three more are waiting to get  in. Find the publications and learn more at Wyoming after 3

From a Nation at Risk to a Nation at Hope

January 15, 2019: The Aspen Institute National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development (SEAD) published their final report. It highlights the crucial role afterschool plays in supporting the whole child. Find it online: Click Here

Why Wyoming is Using Afterschool Programs to Keep Kids Out of School-to-Prison Pipeline

December 3, 2018: Youth Today published an article written by WYAA Director Linda Barton titled: “Why Wyoming Is Using Afterschool Programs to Keep Kids Out of School-to-Prison Pipeline.” Find it online. Click Here

Juvenile Justice Tools

Reducing the School-to-Prison Pipeline – A Strategy to Serve High-Risk Youth

As of 2017, Wyoming ranks 1st in the nation for suicides among children and youth. As of 2015, Wyoming ranks 1st in the nation for youth committed to residential placement by the courts and 4th in the nation for school referrals to law enforcement. These statistics are attributed to lack of community-based options and resources due in part to Wyoming’s rural nature. WYAA Director Linda Barton shared this PowerPoint presentation to help attendees understand this initiative and think about ways their organizations and communities can make an impact. Download the PowerPoint: Click Here

Understanding N.E.A.R.

Dr. Jennifer Davis with the Wyoming Children’s Trust Fund provided the featured presentation on N.E.A.R. or Neuroscience, Epigenetics, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and Resilience. The first objective for the presentation was to help the audience become familiar with ACEs and the biological effects on the body. The second objective was to begin the conversation around ACEs and its effects. Download the PowerPoint: Click Here

Dr. Davis encouraged attendees to look creatively at problems. One example she used was “The Human Walking Program” from an Australian pet shelter. Find it online.

The Prevalence of ACEs Nationally, By State, and By Race/Ethnicity

In this Research Brief from Child Trends, Vanessa Sacks, MPP, and David Murphey, PhD look at the prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) nationally, by state, and by race/ethnicity. As their overview states, “A growing body of research has made it increasingly apparent that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a critical public health issue.” Download the PDF: Click Here

What Works and What Doesn’t

Dr. Adrienne Freng presented on “What Works and What Doesn’t.” The focus was on Prevention Coalitions, Coordinated Efforts, Definition of “Good” Programs, and Efficient Use of Resources. Download the PowerPoint: Click Here

Connecting Kids to Success Will Prevent Crime

Barrie Becker and Martha Brooks, with Council for a Strong America presented: “Connecting Kids to Success Will Prevent Crime and More.” They had a focus on connecting the dots between Parents, Schools and Afterschool Programs; Health/Mental Health and Schools; Police and Schools; and Businesses and Schools. Download the PowerPoint: Click Here

Mission: The Wyoming Afterschool Alliance is a statewide network working to create the conditions for young people to reach their full potential. We are a priority fund of the Wyoming Community Foundation.

WYOMING AFTERSCHOOL ALLIANCE

1472 N. 5th Street, Suite 201
Laramie, WY 82072
Phone: 307-721-8300

 

AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS IN WYOMING ARE HIGH-QUALITY, EDUCATION-FOCUSED, SAFE PLACES FOR ALL OF WYOMING’S YOUTH. QUALITY PRACTICES HELP MAKE THIS POSSIBLE!

 

WYOMING PROGRAM QUALITY PRACTICES

(PQPs) are research-based guidelines that provide a common understanding of the essential components of quality practice in afterschool and youth development programs.

The PQPs provide programs, communities and stakeholders with a way to voluntarily examine the quality of programs and to engage in important discussions about program quality. They set the stage for development of a comprehensive and coordinated system of services that will best serve Wyoming’s children and youth. Most of all, they send the message that we believe quality is important, and we hold ourselves accountable for improving quality.

Download the PQPs (Updated in March 2022)

WYOMING PROGRAM QUALITY PRACTICES WEBINAR

The Wyoming Afterschool Alliance with assistance from National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST – http://www.niost.org/) produced an informative 20-minute webinar to walk through the PQPs and information about how to put them into practice in your afterschool program!

  • Section 1: Introduction to the Wyoming Program Quality Practice
  • Section 2: Putting the PQPs into Practice
  • Section 3: Connecting Quality

The webinar was produced in partnership with Wyoming afterschool professionals: Tamera Allen – Program Director of Double AAces in Weston County SD #1, Karen Bierhaus – Education Consultant with 21st CCLC at the Wyoming Department of Education, Shannon Christian – Executive Director of the Worland Youth Learning Center, Kei Owen – former Grant Assistant with the Natrona County Prevention Coalition, Tamra Petersen – Program Coordinator with the Uinta County BOES Education Center, and Christine Turner – former Program Director with Lincoln County School District #1.

Watch the PQP Webinar

WYOMING PROGRAM QUALITY PRACTICES USER GUIDE

This user guide describes how the PQPs fit into WYAA’s quality improvement efforts and offers concrete ways to use the PQPs. All school age, afterschool, and youth development programs in Wyoming can use this guide to improve their programming. This guide may also be a resource for families, community members, funders, and advocates who partner with program providers to improve outcomes for children and youth.

The user guide provides context for the eight domains of the PQPs:

  1. Physical Environment, Curriculum, and Program Activities
  2. Assessment, Planning, and Improvement
  3. Relationships
  4. Child and Youth Engagement
  5. Families and Communities
  6. Safety, Health, and Wellness
  7. Leadership and Administration
  8. Professional Development

Download the User Guide

WYOMING PROGRAM QUALITY PRACTICES SELF ASSESSMENT

This tool was designed to help afterschool and youth development professionals develop high-quality out-of-school time programs. It may also be a useful checklist for families. This self-assessment is a companion to the PQPs, which are based on research on best practices in programs for afterschool and youth development.

Download the Self Assessment Tool

CORE COMPETENCIES

The National Afterschool Alliance’s Core Knowledge and Competencies enable afterschool and youth development practitioners to demonstrate expertise and gain a higher level of recognition within their communities–particularly from school officials–that has long been sought after.

Check out the Core Competencies

THE STATE OF AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMMING IN WYOMING: AN ASSESSMENT OF NEEDS AND PERCEPTIONSS

In 2010, the Wyoming Afterschool Alliance, a C.S. Mott Foundation Statewide Afterschool Network and an initiative of the Wyoming Community Foundation, launched a research project to survey the capacity of public and private afterschool systems and to assess their effectiveness across Wyoming.

Download the Executive Summary.

Download the Wyoming Afterschool Quality Improvement Three-Year Initiative.

APAS – AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM ASSESSMENT SYSTEM

Program assessment is invaluable to creating the highest quality afterschool programs. WYAA, with support from National Institute of Out of School Time (NIOST) implemented the initiative.

Outcomes from APAS include:

  • An upward trend in attitudes, skills and behaviors of youth
  • Peer networking and relationship building between programs
  • A statewide shared vision and understanding of high quality afterschool and OST programming

Learn more.

WYOMING CAREER DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM REPORT

The Wyoming Career Development System Report identifies six components of a comprehensive career development system and makes recommendations for advancing each component in Wyoming. A cross-sector, continuum approach (one that supports those who serve a broad range of ages) is the most cost-effective way to provide quality programming for children and youth. With this in mind, these recommendations build on current systems and initiatives established in the early childhood field.

Download the Summary document. 

Download the Report.